Debbie Investigates Math and Science Education News

Each week Debbie Osborne scours the web for the best math and science educational news and opportunities for teachers.

 

 

Ha!
Scott Lopez on Facebook
 

 

Finding the Beauty in Math by Holly Korbey
Mind/Shift
Professor Manil Suri wants students to “fall in love” with math, and suggests that maybe our entire approach to math is upside down, and deserves to be righted.
MindShift

TINKER: Free creative STEM newsletter for kids launches in October
Kids Invent
Kids can receive monthly email newsletter with hands-on, open-ended activities by adding their email address at: http://www.kidsinvent.com/tinker_nl.asp

Science educators and parents can see receive the free monthly newsletter, “Creative Learning Activities” by adding their address at: http://www.kidsinvent.com/newsletter.asp. They can also see recent editions of the newsletter at this site.

Both newsletters have a one click discontinue feature.

Learning Math through Stories – Pennsylvania Schools
Montgomery Media
I love this!
Second Grade

Debbie Osborne

Debbie Osborne is AIMS’ Staff Development Coordinator collaborating with schools and districts throughout the US and internationally to plan their Math and Science staff development workshops and programs. Debbie holds a Master’s of Public Administration degree. It’s sad but also true: Debbie is a member of the Crazy Cat Lady Club, America (and a dog). Feel free to contact Debbie at dosborne@aimsedu.org

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2 Responses to Debbie Investigates Math and Science Education News

  1. I went to Holly Korbey’s site to read her post. She quotes a professor Strogatz, a university math professor who is also apparently a newpaper columnist. He talks in particular about the high school and middle school math curriculum which he says too often doesn’t appeal to students’ hearts, instead offering answers to questions that kids would never ask — which he calls ‘the definition of boredom.” I’m afraid that over the past more than 40 years of teaching mathematics, I’ve too often been guilty of that very thing. It’s why I’m excited about the activities we at AIMS are working to create that provide a setting within which students are confronted with asking some of these questions for themselves, and being motivated to find the answers.

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